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weed in malaysia

Malaysia can be the world’s biggest marijuana producer. Here’s how.

While Thailand recently became the first in Southeast Asia to legalize medical marijuana, its neighbor Malaysia is still mulling.

Now Jeram assemblyman Mohd Shaid Rosli is trying his best to make his fellow politicians realize the money making capabilities of the herb.

Despite laughter, the lawmaker has proposed that parts of the Kuala Selangor constituency be turned into an agricultural hub to cultivate and research the marijuana plant for medical purposes.

Marijuana can be a booming business should governments decriminalize the plant.

“Let me give you an example. You can get RM3,000 an acre per year for palm oil. Ganja brings in RM9 million a year. one acre with three harvests can get you RM9 million a year.

“If Selangor can produce (ganja) across more than 100 acres, we will be the world’s biggest (ganja) producer. This can put Selangor on the world map and make us famous,” Mohd Shaid says.

Despite a strict drug law, Malaysia’s Dangerous Drugs Act 1952 however allows government agencies and departments to plant marijuana for medical purposes.

Currently, there’s a local company that has planted the herb for medical research and export purposes by collaborating with the National Poison Centre Director, Professor Mohamed Isa Abd Majid.

Marijuana has been used as alternative medicine by some to treat chronic illnesses.

The Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia lawmaker adds that since Malaysia’s Health Minister Dzulkefly Ahmad is the member of parliament for the Kuala Selangor constituency, the opportunity is for the taking.

Yet, there were some who were against the proposal. Ijok assemblyman Dr Idris Ahmad is one of them who warned the lawmakers that regulating the herb would be a challenge.

“Historically, ganja was used as a medicine but it has been abused, just like opium and morphine. These are dangerous drugs that must be controlled. Even simple medication classified by the Health Ministry is difficult to control.

“I’m a doctor, I know this problem regarding controlled medicine. We need better enforcement,” Dr Idris explains.

Muhammad Lukman was sentenced to death in August last year for selling cannabis oil to cancer stricken patients.

Recently, talks to make medical marijuana legal have been discussed in the open – a positive sign nonetheless despite the conservative stance by many against the herb.

In fact, the plant was one of the catalyst which led Malaysia to abolish its death penalty five months ago following uproar over the death sentence of a man found guilty for selling cannabis oil for medical purpose.

Muhammad Lukman was distributing medical marijuana to several cancer stricken patients. His death sentence was eventually dropped following a review.

Yet, the question still remains: Should the plant be legalized for medical purposes?

The state of Selangor is rich in land mass to cultivate the plant.

Weed in malaysia

RECORDS show that cannabis, commonly called marijuana or ganja in Malaysia, has been used for hundreds of years.

Historically, other than being used as a sedative, it was also used during various religious rituals. Due to its hallucinatory effect, it was said that those who consumed it during meditation were able to predict the future and see supernatural things.

The principal active chemical constituent found in cannabis is tetrahydrocannabinol which has a psychoactive effect. High doses of tetrahydrocannabinol will cause hallucinogenic effects.

Users are not able to tell the difference between fantasy and reality and the hallucinations experienced are euphoric in nature. This feeling of euphoria is what leads to constant cravings and eventually, addiction to cannabis.

Conversely, at lower doses, the psychoactive effect of tetrahydrocannabinol can have an inhibitory effect on the brain and suppression of the nervous system resulting in a calm and sleepy sensation among its users.

Although cannabis has been legalised in several countries, use of cannabis is a serious criminal offence in Malaysia based on the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.

Recently, there have been a number of parties campaigning for the legalisation of cannabis use in Malaysia. Their arguments spawn from the belief that cannabis has medicinal value and can be used to treat a variety of diseases and medical conditions including Alzheimer\u2019s.

Society should not be deceived by individuals who use cannabis recreationally under the pretext of \u201cmedical use\u201d.

Medical cannabis, or medical marijuana, is cannabis and cannabinoids that are prescribed by physicians for their patients.

The use of cannabis as medicine has not been rigorously tested due to production and governmental restrictions, resulting in limited clinical research to define the safety and efficacy of using it to treat diseases.

Nevertheless, several medicines containing cannabis in pharmaceutical dosage form have been used in hospitals to treat patients without causing unwanted side effects such as hallucinations, or worse, addiction.

However, some parties have chosen to interpret medical marijuana differently. They support a distorted opinion that the medical benefits of cannabis outweigh the risks of abuse and try to downplay the side effects and addiction potential cannabis poses to its consumer.

RISK OF ADDICTION

There is a perception that cannabis, even in its original form or its extracts, if smoked or consumed orally (baked, beverages or drops), can have health benefits. This perception has yet to be proven through credible and unbiased clinical studies.

Smoking or consuming cannabis in its original form for health benefits should be strongly rejected in the absence of proper research as it could lead to serious unwarranted health risks.

According to research in the United States in 2013, over 800,000 people aged 12 years and above were under treatment to overcome cannabis addiction. About 10 per cent of these individuals were found to have severe addiction to cannabis. The same study also reported that from a total of 6.9 million substance abusers, 4.2 million abused cannabis-based substances.

Other than addiction, misuse of cannabis has also been proven to cause psychological and mental health problems. Furthermore, the duration of cannabis abuse is directly associated with the severity of mental health effects. There are also studies done that call attention to the negative impact of cannabis abuse on the family, educational institutions and society.

From a religious standpoint, the use of cannabis is deemed\u00a0haram\u00a0or prohibited, by the Muzakarah Jawatankuasa Fatwa Majlis Kebangsaan. The prohibition status serves as a strong motivation, particularly for the Muslim community, to outright refuse the legalisation efforts of cannabis in Malaysia.

Cannabis addiction is a global issue. Its negative impact and the potential hazards it can lead to, should not be taken lightly. The unlawful and unregulated use of cannabis may easily lead to misuse, consequently resulting in a myriad of health and social problems. Pressure from various groups to legalise cannabis use will cause serious repercussions to the nation if not managed properly.

If there are any inquiries regarding cannabis or medicines, please call the National Pharmacy Call Centre (NPCC) at the toll-free line 1800-88-6722 on weekdays from 8am to 5pm.

Article by Abida Haq and Umi Kalsom, pharmacists,\u00a0Ministry of Health Malaysia

\u00a9 New Straits Times Press (M) Bhd “,”body_with_inline”:”

The use of cannabis as medicine has not been rigorously tested and caution must be exercised. \n

RECORDS show that cannabis, commonly called marijuana or ganja in Malaysia, has been used for hundreds of years. \n

Historically, other than being used as a sedative, it was also used during various religious rituals. Due to its hallucinatory effect, it was said that those who consumed it during meditation were able to predict the future and see supernatural things. \n

The principal active chemical constituent found in cannabis is tetrahydrocannabinol which has a psychoactive effect. High doses of tetrahydrocannabinol will cause hallucinogenic effects. \n

Users are not able to tell the difference between fantasy and reality and the hallucinations experienced are euphoric in nature. This feeling of euphoria is what leads to constant cravings and eventually, addiction to cannabis. \n

Conversely, at lower doses, the psychoactive effect of tetrahydrocannabinol can have an inhibitory effect on the brain and suppression of the nervous system resulting in a calm and sleepy sensation among its users. \n

Although cannabis has been legalised in several countries, use of cannabis is a serious criminal offence in Malaysia based on the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952. \n

GET INFORMED \n

Recently, there have been a number of parties campaigning for the legalisation of cannabis use in Malaysia. Their arguments spawn from the belief that cannabis has medicinal value and can be used to treat a variety of diseases and medical conditions including Alzheimer\u2019s. \n

Society should not be deceived by individuals who use cannabis recreationally under the pretext of \u201cmedical use\u201d. \n

Medical cannabis, or medical marijuana, is cannabis and cannabinoids that are prescribed by physicians for their patients. \n

The use of cannabis as medicine has not been rigorously tested due to production and governmental restrictions, resulting in limited clinical research to define the safety and efficacy of using it to treat diseases. \n

Nevertheless, several medicines containing cannabis in pharmaceutical dosage form have been used in hospitals to treat patients without causing unwanted side effects such as hallucinations, or worse, addiction. \n

However, some parties have chosen to interpret medical marijuana differently. They support a distorted opinion that the medical benefits of cannabis outweigh the risks of abuse and try to downplay the side effects and addiction potential cannabis poses to its consumer. \n

RISK OF ADDICTION \n

There is a perception that cannabis, even in its original form or its extracts, if smoked or consumed orally (baked, beverages or drops), can have health benefits. This perception has yet to be proven through credible and unbiased clinical studies. \n

Smoking or consuming cannabis in its original form for health benefits should be strongly rejected in the absence of proper research as it could lead to serious unwarranted health risks. \n

According to research in the United States in 2013, over 800,000 people aged 12 years and above were under treatment to overcome cannabis addiction. About 10 per cent of these individuals were found to have severe addiction to cannabis. The same study also reported that from a total of 6.9 million substance abusers, 4.2 million abused cannabis-based substances. \n

Other than addiction, misuse of cannabis has also been proven to cause psychological and mental health problems. Furthermore, the duration of cannabis abuse is directly associated with the severity of mental health effects. There are also studies done that call attention to the negative impact of cannabis abuse on the family, educational institutions and society. \n

From a religious standpoint, the use of cannabis is deemed\u00a0haram\u00a0or prohibited, by the Muzakarah Jawatankuasa Fatwa Majlis Kebangsaan. The prohibition status serves as a strong motivation, particularly for the Muslim community, to outright refuse the legalisation efforts of cannabis in Malaysia. \n

Cannabis addiction is a global issue. Its negative impact and the potential hazards it can lead to, should not be taken lightly. The unlawful and unregulated use of cannabis may easily lead to misuse, consequently resulting in a myriad of health and social problems. Pressure from various groups to legalise cannabis use will cause serious repercussions to the nation if not managed properly. \n

If there are any inquiries regarding cannabis or medicines, please call the National Pharmacy Call Centre (NPCC) at the toll-free line 1800-88-6722 on weekdays from 8am to 5pm. \n

Article by Abida Haq and Umi Kalsom, pharmacists,\u00a0Ministry of Health Malaysia \n”,”word_count”:698,”og_description”:”The use of cannabis as medicine has not been rigorously tested and caution must be exercised.”>” :nid=”553901″>

The use of cannabis as medicine has not been rigorously tested and caution must be exercised. ]]>