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smoking weed on your period

Can weed relieve menstrual pain?

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Top things to know:

Cannabis is believed to have therapeutic uses for illnesses and pains, including menstrual discomfort

Researches are still scarce, but some studies already show effectiveness of cannabis on the relief of menstrual pain

Worldwide, there has been a noticeable trend in favor of legalising cannabis for medical and recreational use

If you’ve ever visited a healthcare provider for painful periods or cramps, you may have been recommended anti-inflammatory pain medicines or hormonal birth control (D). However, people with menstrual pain often look for other alternatives to painkillers and birth control (B).В

Medicinal plants have been used by many cultures for thousands of years for the treatment and prevention of diseases and their symptoms (A). Cannabis is one such plant that may relieve or lessen menstrual pain (12). Menstrual pain is common—about half of people who menstruate have some pain for one to two days each cycle (C).

The use of cannabis (also called weed and marijuana, among other names) for the treatment of pain has been identified in various places around the world pre-Christianity. It’s believed that medicinal cannabis was introduced to European medicine when physicians first observed the use of the substance in India. The introduction of cannabis in the Americas may have occurred when African slaves who were taken to Brazil brought the plant with them (2).В

What does research say about weed and the menstrual cycle?

Cannabis is believed to have therapeutic uses for a variety of illnesses, including but not limited to chronic pain, headache, epilepsy, symptoms of multiple sclerosis and gastrointestinal disorders (E).В

The science around cannabis and its ability to relieve menstrual pain is scarce, and more research is needed. In 2015, researchers from the University of British Columbia, asked a sample of 192 women if they had used cannabis to relieve menstrual pain. Marijuana is available for purchase from dispensaries in Vancouver.В

Of all the women surveyed, 85 percent said they had used cannabis for menstrual pain and almost 90 percent of these women said it was effective at relieving the pain (12).В

These participants said that the most common ways they consumed cannabis were smoking and eating. Other research indicates that using it might have side effects on the hormones that regulate the menstrual cycle.В

A study of 47 women between 17 and 29 years old who habitually consumed cannabis for at least one year found alterations in progesterone, prolactin and testosterone.В

Compared to women who didn’t use cannabis, these women had more frequent menstrual variations, including shorter cycle length and heavy periods (16). This study didn’t look specifically at period pain, but the results might have indications for period pain since frequency and intensity of bleeding can impact pain.

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A global panorama of cannabis use

Worldwide, there has been a noticeable trend in favor of legalising cannabis for medical use. But before digging into the details of current legislation in some Western countries, it’s important to clarify the uses of this substance and understand the arguments that usually accompany its prohibition.В

Uses of cannabis

There are several possible types of cannabis usage:

Medical purposes: usage eases symptoms of diseases or assists in treating an existing diagnosis.

Scientific purposes: usage as a tool to investigate the substance’s roles in people’s health or diseases (3).

Recreational purposes: usage for pleasure.В

The status of cannabis around the world

For governments around the world, the more well-known reasons for prohibiting the use of cannabis are:

The psychotropic aspect of cannabis, meaning the alteration of the central nervous system.

The addictive aspect , or the difficulty in controlling its consumption.

The prohibition, in addition to criminalising the consumption of cannabis, imposes several inhibitors to conducting scientific research (3).В В

Countries like Canada, United States and the Netherlands are remarkable for having opener politics around cannabis. When it comes to Canada, since the 17th of October, 2018, it has allowed the recreational and medicinal use (5). In the United States, more than 20 states allow its medicinal use, and in the Netherlands since 2001 the medicinal and research uses have been allowed, and under strict control the purchase and consumption of soft drugs have been allowed (3).

As cannabis becomes more popular and mainstream, novel ways of using it for sexual and reproductive health are emerging. Vaginal suppositories and bath salts with THC are being marketed to people with periods as a solution for cramps (15). There’s even arousal lube with THC marketed to intensify sexual pleasure (15).

This diversity of approaches for the consumption and use of cannabis might help increase its popularity. Ideally, as more people use cannabis for period pain, researchers will produce more science about the risks and benefits, in hopes that we learn all the effects of cannabis for women and people with cycles.

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Ideally, as more people use marijuana for period pain, researchers will produce more science about the risks and benefits.

12 Ways to Use Cannabis for a Less Painful Period

In This Article

Here’s the honest to goodness truth of it: I’m not an expert on cannabis for PMS. In fact, I’m not an expert on cannabis in general. And while I could blame this on the fact I grew up in a state where smoking weed was illegal (not that that stopped anyone), my hunch is it has more to do with that one time in Amsterdam when, after consuming an astonishingly potent space cake (note: “Cake” might have actually been plural), I woke up the next morning high as a kite, proceeded to get lost in the cobblestoned streets of Leiden, proceeded to take the wrong train *not* to the airport, and thus, ultimately missed my flight back to Galway, Ireland, where I was living at the time. And as my first time experimenting with the stuff, it wasn’t, shall we say, ideal. So fast-forward four years later and here I am living in Los Angeles (where taking a hit is as normal as bringing your dog into Whole Foods) with a bad taste in my mouth for weed—very un-Angeleno to say the least.

However, that was prior to last month when I had an interesting, out-of-the-box opportunity to take a tour of MedMen—a leading L.A. cannabis management and investment firm with premium retail locations across Los Angeles and Southern California. The goal: to sleuth out the dispensary’s well-fed crop of cannabis-infused wellness products. (If you need a mental visual, it’s basically the Apple store of marijuana and marijuana-infused products.) And, lo and behold, I found the glittering goldmine of cannabis-enriched products to help with PMS, which, while that wasn’t my initial goal, was a standout trend nonetheless. So since no one I know particularly enjoys a painful period, I took some notes and talked to the experts. Can CBD- and THC-rich products lend relief when it comes to PMS symptoms? And perhaps more importantly, do professionals in the health field recommend them? I was curious, and frankly, I thought you would be too. Keep reading to find out what experts think about cannabis for PMS and, if you happen to live in a state where marijuana is legalized, which products we (and the staff at MedMen) think ought to be at the top of your period’s wish list.

CBD + THC Decoded

According to the experts at MedMen, there are more than 100 different chemical compounds in cannabis called cannabinoids—the all-stars being tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). “THC is the psychoactive element that produces feelings of euphoria or the ‘high,'” one of the official spokespeople explains to me, while CBD is associated with some of the more medicinal and reparative effects, such as decreased inflammation, pain management, anxiety reduction, and improved sleep. In fact, Kiana Reeves, a woman’s health advocate, doula, somatic sex educator, and Chief Brand Educator at Foria, laments, “THC also has incredible pain relieving benefits and studies show all of these compounds work best together, otherwise known as the entourage effect. For certain medical conditions, having THC in the formula is essential (for others not as much), but trace amounts are still beneficial. Currently the legal limit for THC in CBD products is less than .3 %

“CBD has been scientifically shown to increase levels of anandamide, a neurotransmitter and the main cannabinoid that is produced by the human body, which can reduce pain and inflammation and can also boost levels of adenosine, another neurotransmitter which plays a key role in inflammation,” says MedMen.

How Do They Work?

But what exactly happens within the body after both compounds are ingested? And on a more specific note, how does any of this have to do with debilitating PMS symptoms like cramps, sleeplessness, anxiety, and the like? Well, this is where it gets scientific (i.e., complicated and interesting), so I reached out to Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD, at the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

After confirming to me that the best-known and most-studied cannabinoids are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), Friedman dove straight into the science of the compounds—exactly what I was craving amid the world’s murky swirl of stigmas, associations, and opinions on the topic of marijuana (and whether or not it has a legal place in our health system and everyday lifestyle.)

“Interestingly, it was the study of marijuana that initially led to the groundbreaking discovery of the human endocannabinoid system (meaning, we make our very own cannabinoids and receptors for them, which make up an extraordinary biological network that plays a role in everything from sensations of pain and itch to mood, inflammation regulation, and wound healing). Essentially, it’s the gold star of drugs,” Friedman tells us. But wait, there’s more.

THC and CBD have very different properties, as they selectively go after each of the respective endocannabinoid receptors in the body, CB1 and CB2. CB1 is found throughout the central nervous system, which is why THC does its thing when smoked or eaten. “Think of it this way,” Friedman puts it: “Cannabinoid receptors are present in pain circuits from the peripheral sensory nerve endings (fingertips) all the way up to the brain, thereby impacting the transmission and interpretation of sensations like pain and itch. The CB2 receptors, however, are found all throughout the immune system.” Which is precisely why, he says, the substance is widely loved and praised for its ability to manage inflammation and wound healing. And since CBD goes after that one particular receptor, it lacks the psychoactive effects commonly attributed to marijuana.

“We are learning more about these receptors every day, and it’s possible that the activation of either can have a similar effect on pain, just through different mechanisms,” Friedman continues. “Therefore, many of the studies in animals and the few in humans use a combination of both THC and CBD to reach an optimal effect depending on the indication.” (Thus why the majority of the cannabis-infused products on the market contain at least a little bit of both.)

So—Cannabis for PMS

“Cannabis- and CBD-infused products are the next big trend in reproductive health because they are so effective and relatively safe at the concentrations found in many commercial products,” neuroscientist and holistic wellness expert Leigh Winters tells me. The major key: the quality and sourcing of the products play a huge role in its safety and ability to help with PMS symptoms. “The truth is that the relief you can expect really depends on the quality of the product. If you have unbearable cramping, CBD products can alleviate those painful bouts of searing pain that leave you unproductive and unable to focus on anything else. CBD has been demonstrated to promote muscle relaxation while reducing stress and inflammation. Within a few minutes of using a topical product or ingesting, you’ll feel relief.”

And while some Western medical experts are still very much off-board, (one OBGYN explicitly telling me she would never recommend the use of cannabis for period relief, as menstruation is an inflammatory process and therefore anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) are the optimal drug of choice), it’s a viewpoint (while still fair and valid) that seems to represent the minority.

Again, Friedman who is exceptionally well-versed in the *often* gray area lends some expertise: “Interestingly, there is definitely evidence that women with severe cramping associated with endometriosis have an impaired endocannabinoid system. What investigators demonstrated was that those with severe pain actually had lower expression of the endocannabinoid receptors as compared to those with mild pain, and in turn churned out higher levels of endocannabinoids to compensate (too bad it had little impact). This suggests cannabinoids are important in the management of menstrual pain.” Translated: This could explain why some women may have more painful cramping than others. But again, it’s just one piece of the puzzle.

With that in mind, Friedman breaks down CBD’s PMS benefits a bit more explicitly:

1. As an anti-inflammatory, CBD can limit the degree of inflammation and swelling, which can both lead to pain.

2. CBD impacts specific temperature-controlling nerve receptors called vanilloid receptors (TRPV), through which it can then desensitize pain nerve fibers.

Professional Thoughts on Products

As you may know (or as you’re soon to find out), high-quality and reliably sourced cannabis products will cost you a pretty penny. So is it worth it? To get a scientific and medical opinion on the concern, I asked both Winters and Friedman which (if any) kinds of cannabis-infused products they’d recommend for PMS relief. The consensus: Yes, cannabis-enriched products can most certainly be used for PMS. The rub: some might have more efficacy than others.

“I always recommend a period-relief CBD tincture because it’s easy to integrate into an existing routine and effective,” Winters tells us. “While there’s an unfortunate dearth of clinical data studying these new formulations and products, tinctures seem to anecdotally win out among all product offerings. Many tinctures come with specific instructions, but you can either put a few drops under your tongue or add a dropperful (sometimes more) to a glass of water or tea. I’m also a big fan of topical CBD salve that you can massage on the lower abdomen. The relief of a topical cream or salve will likely not be as immediate as that of a tincture, but a gentle massage can greatly ameliorate discomfort. In my opinion, the jury is out on the ‘weed tampon’ until more research is done on the trace amounts of THC it contains and how the body reacts to long-term use.” Though, Reeves says there is a lot of anecdotal evidence suggesting cannabis suppositories are one of the most effective ways to support menstrual pain. “The cannabinoids are absorbed locally into the tissues that are inflamed and cramping thereby providing direct relief. There is a study underway investigating this with a Harvard research physician, hopefully publishing at the end of the year,” she says. Good to know.

Friedman elaborates, “First off, many of the over-the-counter CBD-containing creams have other scientifically proven analgesic compounds like menthol, camphor, and capsaicin, so it’s hard to know what’s doing the heavy lifting. Second, we have a good amount of animal data, but not many human studies, where topically applied cannabinoids are concerned. So to be honest, who is to know without the clinical science,” Friedman tells us. That being said, he reassures us these types of treatments (again, if high-quality and trustworthy) certainly won’t hurt you, and it’s worth experimenting if you’re interested in an alternative way to treat PMS symptoms. (And live in a state or region where these types of products are legalized, of course.)

All in all, and despite the fact that the taboo surrounding marijuana is perhaps still stronger than many would like, the future seems to be rather bright medicinally speaking, and as both experts confirmed, knowledge is power.

“I think the consumer has more power than he or she realizes,” Friedman says. “There is untapped potential that needs to be explored, and the consumer should feel free to encourage local, federal, and industry sources to dive deeper to fully elucidate how best to use these medical agents. Public opinion matters.”

“Everyone has a different opinion about CBD and THC, but the tide is certainly turning as more people and medical establishments have come to accept the medicinal component of the cannabis sativa plant,” Winters corroborates. “CBD is not weed—these products will not get you high. Plants can heal, but they can also harm. Always consult with a doctor or herbalist before trying any cannabis-based product or if you have an adverse reaction, but yes, the health paradigms are definitely shifting on the topic,” she concludes.

So with a better understanding of cannabis and its use for PMS under our belts, we thought it’d be fun to ask the experts at MedMen what their best-selling products are in the name of a less-painful period. And while the majority aren’t available to buy online (unless the product is derived from “agricultural hemp” which isn’t, technically speaking, considered “marijuana” under the Controlled Substances Act) you can find them at your local MedMen store or countless other dispensaries around the U.S.

PMS Product Picks

Rich in CBD, this convenient dropper provides you with reliable dosage (check out the brand’s helpful guide here) and an easy way to drop a titch of PMS pain relief into your morning smoothie or beverage of choice.

Expertly and scientifically formulated by Ph.D. chemists and featuring only the best (read: premium) quality hemp, Sagely’s Relief & Recovery capsules are water-soluble, offering highly bioavailable forms of both organic turmeric and CBD for fast and furious absorption. Each capsule features 10mg of CBD and, if taken daily, can help curb tension, inflammation, and pain. So when your period reaches its pinnacle of pain, it might feel more manageable and you might just be able to go on with your day to day life feeling like a normal human being.

Boasting a sweet and soothing cooling sensation, this extra-strength body spray offers fast-as-lightning pain relief perfect for those who suffer from PMS-induced cramps. It’s handily optimal for all skin types, conveniently sized, and expertly balances a small percentage of cannabis with other natural botanical pain relievers like arnica, juniper, peppermint, and clove. Simply spray one to two pumps of mist on your targeted area and wait a few seconds for it to dry.

Another MedMen top seller, this whimsical bath bomb features an addictive citrusy scent, and thanks to an expert infusion of CBD extract (and other skin enhancers like coconut and essential oils), it can lend a helping hand for soothing anxiety and pain (which seem to conveniently peak once Aunt Flo comes to town).

Decadent dark chocolate (lots of it) and our period go together like peanut butter and jelly—it’s a winning, no-brainer combination. Then, go ahead and add 90mg of THC and you’ve reached another level of bliss entirely. Enter Défoncé (translated to “stoned” in French), a bougie and irresistibly cannabis-infused chocolatier lessening period qualms for women everywhere (or at least for those who get major cravings.) MedMen recommends its “Dark+” iteration, which boasts 90mg of THC and 81% pure cacao. Just try to limit your consumption—with 18 pieces per bar, you’ll get roughly 5mg of THC per bite. (A true test of self-control, we know.)

Just when you never thought you’d never see the likes of a vaping pen on Byrdie, well, here we are. (All in the name of preventing period pain, of course.) But despite their perhaps eyebrow-raising reputation, these CBD and THC pens from Dosist can work well for pain management and are infused with custom blends of all-natural terpenes. You’ll need to locate them at participating retailers, though (and prices may vary).

Anti-inflammatory, calmative, and highly effective in pain relief (thus great for pesky PMS symptoms), Kikoko’s Sympa-tea is high in CBD and basically feels like a massage in a cup. Simply brew as you would with any other tea and after 60 seconds the cannabis will have fully dissolved. Also cool: Unlike other plenty of other cannabis-infused drinks, no additional ingredients are needed to activate the tea. Other flavor notes include ginger, turmeric, orange peel, black pepper, star anise, cinnamon, and licorice root for further anti-inflammatory benefits. And if you have questions, the brand has a great FAQ section.

Thanks to pharmacological-grade Epsom salt, apricot kernel oil, avocado seed oil, jojoba oil, vitamin E, aloe vera, essential oils, and oh yeah, sun-grown cannabis, this isn’t your average bath soak. We highly recommend it come that time of the month when you’re feeling especially crampy and achy, as its medical cannabis promotes relaxation and yes, epic pain relief. (Plus, it has a luscious, warm, and woodsy scent.)

If you’re in the market for a hard-hitting topical that has the potential to offer hours of pain relief, this all-natural botanical balm might be a good option. It’s enriched with hydrating coconut oil and the award-winning 3:1 ratio formulation has more than 400 mg of cannabinoids per jar.

Yes, this might be pricey, but if you’re one who suffers from PMS-induced cramps and body aches, this extra-strength, gluten-free elixir feels heavenly for sore muscles and those times for when it feels like there’s an alien inside you. It’s expertly formulated with 100mg of CBD, and each measured pump will dispense 1ml of lotion containing 2mg of CBD for perfect dosing. Oh, and it also smells like sage, mint, and green citrus. Which is very, very nice.

A mixture of California wildflower honey and cannabis-infused cold-pressed virgin coconut oil, these ingredients offer plenty of benefits where pain relief is concerned. Plus, thanks to the Indica strain of cannabis this sweet honey bear features, MedMen tells us it will have an ever-so-slight sedative effect.

According to a MedMen spokesperson, Foria’s beloved suppositories have been carefully crafted to maximize the muscle-relaxing and pain-relieving benefits of cannabis without a psychotropic effect. Boasting antispasmodic and pain-relieving properties, you’ll apply the suppositories directly to the area in need of relief —yes, they go directly into your vagina. Not all that surprisingly, they’re one of MedMen’s best-selling products.

Ed note: Everyone is different and certain products may have subtle intoxication effects and become habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate motor vehicles or machinery under the influence and products are for use by adults 21 years of age and older. Effects of marijuana and marijuana products may be delayed up to two hours. Use of marijuana while pregnant or breastfeeding may be harmful. Keep out of reach of children.

We explore the best ways to use cannabis for PMS symptoms. Click here for the products we (and the experts) think you will love.