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Seed shadows, seed predation and the advantages of dispersal

  • Rodolfo Dirzo
  • César A. Domínguez

Abstract

Given the universal prevalence of plant modifications for dispersal, it is appropiate to ask what advantages do these traits provide. In this paper we propose that ecological phenomena that have selected for these ‘adaptations’ are operational at a local scale and argue that for a proper evaluation of dispersal, it is mandatory to explore the ecological consequences of this phenomenon, besides the dispersal event itself. Here we explore some of the consequences of dispersal, placing special emphasis on the role of post-dispersal seed predation — one of the major presumed advantages of dispersal. In this analysis we include a discussion of i) the hypothesis of escape from predation as a function of distance from propagule source, ii) the effects of several additional factors such as demographic events occurring at subsequent stages of the plant’s life cycle, and iii) the population dynamics of seeds after the dispersal event. An analysis of the possible qualitative and quantitative effects of pre-dispersal predation is also included.

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Given the universal prevalence of plant modifications for dispersal, it is appropiate to ask what advantages do these traits provide. In this paper we propose that ecological phenomena that have…

Seed shadow

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Block Reference: #289d6790-3714-11eb-9171-51dac5da4265
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IP: 62.113.118.27
Date and time: Sat, 05 Dec 2020 16:08:48 GMT

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