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Basic Genetics Terminology For Cannabis

Our beloved marijuana strains are produced using several different breeding methods. Check out the terminology used to describe the unique genetics of different cannabis varieties.

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Breeding cannabis is a complicated art that can be performed in plenty of ways. Here, we describe the common terms surrounding various cannabis genetics and how they came to be. We decided to keep it short and concise, as all the scientific minutiae can be very complex.

LANDRACE

Landrace varieties originate from regions where cannabis plants have been growing for a very long time in the wild—centuries, or even millennia. This naturally creates stable, robust genetics that produce a homogeneous offspring. This means that the landrace strains from a particular area will develop very similar growth patterns, appearance, and chemical composition. Hindu Kush or China Yunnan are examples of pure landrace strains.

F1 stands for a “first generation hybrid”. When two strains with completely different genotypes breed, for example, a Master Kush with Durban Poison, their offspring will be an F1 hybrid. When this hybrid is bred together with another F1 hybrid from the same batch (a sister or a brother), it creates an F2 hybrid. When this process is repeated, it creates an F3, then F4, and so on. After F5, the plants can be considered as IBL.

IBL stands for “inbred line”, meaning that after several generations of hybridising a specific lineage, the strains become almost like a different family of strains. Skunks were hybridised and selected for their very pungent and potent nature, and after many generations, they developed into the Cheese family, which can be called an IBL.

POLY-HYBRIDS

Poly-hybrids derive from mixing completely different hybrids with each other. For example, Master Kush and Durban Poison produce offspring called F1(A); AK-47 and White Widow produce an offspring called F1(B). When F1(A) and F1(B) have a lovechild, it will be coined as a poly-hybrid.

BACKCROSSES

Backcrossing refers to taking a hybrid strain and breeding it back with the original parent. For example, a male Chocolope and a female Jack Herer develop an F1 hybrid. When this F1 hybrid is hybridised with the original female Jack Herer, the resulting strain will be coined as BX1. When this BX1 gets backcrossed again with the original female Jack Herer, it will be coined as BX2, and so on. The genetics of the original female strain can be retained by keeping the plant in the vegetative stage as a mother, keeping the cuttings as clones or using tissue culture propagation.

SELFING

Selfing is when a mother plant is pollinated by herself. Breeders use special chemicals on female plants to induce stress, which results in the plants producing male flowers, which produce pollen. When this pollen in used on the female flowers of the same plant or a clone from the same mother, the resulting seeds will be “selfed” or coined as S1. When the S1 seeds are backcrossed with the original parent, they’re called S2, S3, and so on. Breeders often do this to preserve the genetics of the strain, and to feminize the seeds.

Cannabis genetics are not all the same. We are here to clear up any confusion surrounding breeding terminology, from landraces to IBL.

S1 seeds

shepj
Oracle of Hallucinogens
shepj
Oracle of Hallucinogens
dahamma
Well-Known Member
shepj
Oracle of Hallucinogens

I know what an F1 is . But I think the generations to make it stable are more around 4-5. Thx +rep for help

So the question still stands, WTF is a S1?

Tricks
Well-Known Member
shepj
Oracle of Hallucinogens
Tricks
Well-Known Member
shepj
Oracle of Hallucinogens

+rep thx for the help.

Hopefully someone can tell me how this is done?

frmrboi
Well-Known Member
shepj
Oracle of Hallucinogens
Aruanda
Well-Known Member
HydroRed
Well-Known Member
CaptainCAVEMAN
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Aruanda
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Wilderb
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droopy107
Well-Known Member
Daniel Lawton
Well-Known Member

I already posted some of this elsewhere, however I keep learning over time and want to pass on helpful info. I apologize to the seed sellers, because in fact, if you have just one of their feminized seeds, you can make hundreds very easily. Fortunately, most people are rather lazy and impatient, and since a $5-$10 seeds gets you $$$$$ in pot, hopefully the seed sellers will continue to be very successful.

I’m experimenting with making S1 seeds, mostly just because I’m an autistic nerd and want to know how. I have no plans to sell any (which is illegal in Cal.).

I have 10 autoflower variety of plants growin right now (in 2 locations to keep pollen from mixing). 4 of my seed bearing plants are using colloidal silver forced pollen from one F1 plant, spread onto another F1 plant who’s 3-4 weeks younger.

All are making seeds. Pretty much, if you make colloidal silver, spray until you see the male pods (you’ll be worried the first time, but once you know them you’ll never worry again), you will absolutely get pollen. And trust the pics on the net. If you’re in doubt, once they start to have darker lines on them (maybe purple), you’re in business. If they open up, you can use tweesers to harvest pollen pods, as long as you see several (4 or 5) green or yellow fibers in them (bananas). Don’t have to be yellow, just put them in something and let it dry. But in the long run, you might learn you don’t have to harvest them at all. It’s always easy to make a plant produce it’s own pollen! So why save the stuff?

I goofed up on an AK47 and sprayed it even after the male pods formed, stunting pollen making. Everyone kept emphasizing how you might even have to spray it 3 times a day, so I went overboard.

Produced no pollen in the time I expected. So I ditched it to another room, not wanting to kill it.

That sucker is still alive today, 2 months past it’s predicted lifespan. It’s making so much pollen that I don’t even collect it. Looks to me like she might even pollinate a few of the flower hairs she’s managed to grow along with the really old pollen sacs. We’ll see. That would be a free S1.

One White Widow in particular is making huge amounts of seeds. In her case, she sat next to one of her own kind, 4 weeks older and forced to make pollen using colloidal silver. Then when the entire older plant was covered in male pollen sacs and most were bursting open, I fluffed it with my hands towards the second plant. It was a HEAVY yellow cloud of pollen. I choked from it! Now I can sympathize with those who have asthma from pollen.

Thus he’s FULL of seeds. Not only that, but the first plant that made the huge burst of pollen, has done it again and again and again. I’m going to have to sweep up that floor. Meanwhile, the plant I forced to make pollen grew some flowers anyway, and she’s pollinated herself.

In another case, I collected pollen first, let that plant mature and die, then tried to use the pollen on another of his kind (Lowryder#2). Both were F1. I got seeds, but nothing like the ones I got with that huge burst of pollen. I tried to paint the pollen on with a brush, only to find out, that doesn’t work as well as people claim. You get a few seeds per flower bud. And you can tell in 3 days if you’re getting any, because the white hairs that accepted pollen turn orange. But a ton of them don’t change color at all, and if you wait a week or two, you can see that you only got a few seeds. So the brush doesn’t work well, unless you’re handy with it and very patient.

I finally learned what I believe is the best trick for making seeds. Just spray only part of the plant with colloidal silver, let that make male pods, then let those pollinate the flowers on the same plant, where you didn’t spray. Just fluff it up when the pollen is ready, and there’s a ton of flowers.

I didn’t try that the first time because I thought that autoflowering varieties didn’t all live long enough to make seeds using their own pollen.

I was dead wrong. Take the times they give you for lowryder#2, AK47, Super Skunk, and add a MONTH to the actual life of the plant. The underestimate. Those 3 are all able to make seeds using their own pollen. Not to mention the longer lived autoflowers, like blueberry.

One thing I learned about making colloidal silver. There’s a lot of superstition in that area. I’m hoping UC Davis’s new marijuana department will clear up some of the marijuana controversies.

In the case of colloidal silver, it DOES NOT harm the plant, if you follow good directions for making it (like on this forum).

Also, the TDS meter doesn’t work on colloidal silver. Or at least, mine doesn’t. I brewed it until it read 50, then for fun I brewed it some more. Read 50 2 more days in a row. So I took the 50 silver, diluted it with equally as much water, and it still read 50.

But, it doesn’t get a yellow/brown color like they say. Just go for that, works fine without measuring it.

Also, the silver wires you use, DO WEAR OUT. I’m not sure why people are claiming you can brew thousands of batches. Those little suckers wear out after about 5 batches. And after each batch, if you look closely, they’ve gotten thinner. To balance that out, switch + and – once in a while. One of them wears out more than the other.

heyy guys, I hear this term thrown around every once in a while, and so I gather it means Selfed? But what the hell does that actually mean? Like what's…