Categories
BLOG

olanzapine and marijuana

Tobacco and cannabis smoking cessation can lead to intoxication with clozapine or olanzapine

Affiliation

  • 1 Unit of Biochemistry and Clinical Psychopharmacology, University Department of Adult Psychiatry, Prilly, Lausanne, Switzerland. [email protected]
  • PMID: 11981356
  • DOI: 10.1097/00004850-200205000-00008

Tobacco and cannabis smoking cessation can lead to intoxication with clozapine or olanzapine

  • Search in PubMed
  • Search in NLM Catalog
  • Add to Search

Authors

Affiliation

  • 1 Unit of Biochemistry and Clinical Psychopharmacology, University Department of Adult Psychiatry, Prilly, Lausanne, Switzerland. [email protected]
  • PMID: 11981356
  • DOI: 10.1097/00004850-200205000-00008

Abstract

Plasma levels of clozapine and olanzapine are lower in smokers than in nonsmokers, which is mainly due to induction of cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2) by some smoke constituents. Smoking cessation in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs that are CYP1A2 substrates may result in increased plasma levels of the drug and, consequently, in adverse drug effects. Two cases of patients who smoked tobacco and cannabis are reported. The first patient, who was receiving clozapine treatment, developed confusion after tobacco and cannabis smoking cessation, which was related to increased clozapine plasma levels. The second patient, who was receiving olanzapine treatment, showed important extrapyramidal motor symptoms after reducing his tobacco consumption. The clinical implication of these observations is that smoking patients treated with CYP1A2 substrate antipsychotics should regularly be monitored with regard to their smoking consumption in order to adjust doses in cases of a reduction or increase in smoking.

Plasma levels of clozapine and olanzapine are lower in smokers than in nonsmokers, which is mainly due to induction of cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2) by some smoke constituents. Smoking cessation in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs that are CYP1A2 substrates may result in increased plasma leve …

Does olanzapine inhibit the psychomimetic effects of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol?

Affiliation

  • PMID: 22596206
  • DOI: 10.1177/0269881112446534

Does olanzapine inhibit the psychomimetic effects of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol?

  • Search in PubMed
  • Search in NLM Catalog
  • Add to Search

Authors

Affiliation

  • PMID: 22596206
  • DOI: 10.1177/0269881112446534

Abstract

Δ⁹-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces transient psychomimetic effects in healthy volunteers, constituting a pharmacological model for psychosis. The dopaminergic antagonist haloperidol has previously been shown to reduce these effects. This placebo-controlled, cross-over study in 49 healthy, male, mild cannabis users aimed to further explore this model by examining the effect of a single oral dose of olanzapine (with dopaminergic, serotonergic, adrenergic, muscarinergic and histaminergic properties) or two oral doses of diphenhydramine (histamine antagonist) on the effects of intrapulmonarily administered THC. Transient psychomimetic symptoms were seen after THC administration, as measured on the positive and negative syndrome scale (20.6% increase on positive subscale, p Gupta S, De Aquino JP, D’Souza DC, Ranganathan M. Gupta S, et al. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2019 Sep;236(9):2635-2640. doi: 10.1007/s00213-019-05235-x. Epub 2019 Mar 27. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2019. PMID: 30919005 Free PMC article.

Δ⁹-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces transient psychomimetic effects in healthy volunteers, constituting a pharmacological model for psychosis. The dopaminergic antagonist haloperidol has previously been shown to reduce these effects. This placebo-controlled, cross-over study in 49 healthy, male, …