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Cannabis Indica

Cannabis Indica L. is generally agreed to have originated either on the Asian subcontinent, or possibly in Afghanistan.

French naturalist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, the first European botanist to classify this type in 1785, received his samples from India and dubbed the plant Cannabis Indica in recognition of that fact.

Types of Cannabis

General physical appearance of Indica Strains

The typical example of Cannabis Indica is a more compact, thick-stemmed bush than its cousins, usually reaching a height of less than two metres. The foliage is generally a dark shade of green, some examples appearing to have almost blue or green-black leaves. These leaves are composed of short, wide blades.

Indica strains tend to produce more side-branches and denser overall growth than Sativas, resulting in wider, bushier plants. Indica flowers form in thick clusters around the nodes of the female plant (the points at which pairs of leaves grow from the stem and branches). They usually weigh more than Sativa flowers of similar size, as they are more solid.

Growth and flowering cycle of Cannabis Indica

The life cycle of Cannabis Indica, like the rest of the Cannabis genus, is divided into two distinct phases – vegetation and flowering – which are reactions to different day-lengths (photoperiods). Vegetation is also sometimes referred to simply as the growth, or growing, period, although the plant continues to grow in size and mass throughout the flowering period as well.

Vegetation occurs when the plant experiences long days and short nights, known as the long photoperiod. When growing, Cannabis Indica devotes its energy to increasing in size and stature. As days become shorter and nights longer (the short photoperiod), the plant receives the signal that autumn is approaching and its flowering phase is triggered.

In the flowering phase, upward and outward growth slows considerably and may appear to cease completely as Cannabis Indica directs the bulk of its energy to growing reproductive parts – male flowers which distribute pollen, or female flowers which produce the majority of cannabinoids and are meant to receive pollen and produce seeds. If male plants are eliminated early in the flowering phase, female plants are prevented from making seeds and their cannabinoid-rich flowers (also referred to as buds, tops or colas) may be harvested for recreational and medicinal use.

Common effects and properties of Indica Strains

Most Indicas are a rich source of the cannabinoids THC, CBD and CBN. While Cannabis Sativa often produces a higher proportion of THC compared to its other cannabinoids, Cannabis Indica often contains significant levels of all three. Indicas tend to produce more body-centred effects than Sativas – enhancement of physical sensations, relaxation, dry mouth, red eyes. These effects are often grouped together under the term ‘stoned’, as opposed to the ‘high’ imparted by Sativas. This is not to say that Indicas have no psychoactive effect, just that they are more renowned for their noticeable effects on the body.

Cannabis Indica strains are cultivated almost exclusively for their medicinal and psychoactive properties, and may be the most commonly used medicinal marijuana strains. Cannabis Indica’s firm stem and thin bark make it unsuitable for fibre production.

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Cannabis Indica Cannabis Indica L. is generally agreed to have originated either on the Asian subcontinent, or possibly in Afghanistan. French naturalist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, the first

Hemp Vs Cannabis: Learn the Differences

You probably know about Cannabis but do you know about Hemp? Are they both one and the same thing? Is one a strain of the other? Can one smoke hemp? Is it even legal? If you’re not sure about the answers to these questions then this blog post is for you. Educate yourself about these two lest you misinterpret them and probably make a huge blunder.

What is Hemp and what is Cannabis?

Cannabis is divided into two major pure strains – Indica and Sativa. Hemp is a variety of the Cannabis Sativa strain. However, although both Cannabis and Hemp are from the same species, they have very diverse applications. Cannabis Sativa and Indica strains are mostly used for psychotropic and medicinal uses. However, Hemp is almost purely used for industrial uses.

Differences in plant anatomy

Hemp and Cannabis plants have very identical anatomies. To the amateurish eye, both might look like one and the same – but they are not. They both have thin stems and a similar leaf pattern usually with about 5 to 7 leaflets. They even have similar flowering anatomies. They feature buds and colas. The main difference, however, is the height of the plants. Cannabis Indica and Sativa plants are not that tall. Indica plants are especially short. Hemp plants, on the other hand, grow to be much taller and can reach heights of up to two meters.

Differences in Uses

Cannabis Indica and Sativa strain are mostly used for psychotropic uses – to get high. This psychotropic use can either be recreational in nature or medicinal. Cannabis is also used to prepare meals if applied directly or by using extracts. In all these uses, it is the buds that are harvested for their THC content.

Hemp on the other hand is mostly used for industrial purposes. The stalk and the seeds are the main usable parts. As one of the fastest-growing plants on the planet, Hemp has for centuries been used as a viable eco-friendly option in the manufacture of fabric, clothing, paper, plastic, insulation, mulch, litter, animal feed, and human food, among others.

Differences in THC concentration

Cannabis has psycho-active effects because it contains considerable amounts of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). This is the stuff that gets you high once you eat, smoke or dab weed. Usually, the amounts range from 10 -25% in regards to potency. However, with Hemp, the THC content is very low – usually less than 1%. As such, Hemp has negligible psycho-active uses. You just can’t get high from it no matter how much of it you consume.

Differences in legality

Both Hemp and Cannabis are classified as drugs in the US. That is because they are both Cannabis plants and contain THC (even though the THC concentration in Hemp is almost negligible). However, just as Cannabis is legal in some states for recreational or medicinal use, Hemp is also legal in others for industrial and research use.

And now you know. So if your buddies try to claim that they have been getting high on hemp, you can go ahead and call their bluff, and then proceed to educate them why.

Cannabis and hemp – are they both one and the same thing? Learn more on some of the differences between the two unique plants.