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Cannabis Lemonade – A Great Treat For The Summer

Canna-infused lemonade is one of the great rewards of a hot summer day! Even better? It is super easy to make. Try our recipe!

Ice cold, cannabis-infused lemonade is one of the great pleasures of the summer. Even better news? It is super easy to make. The easiest method is to simply add canna-tincture to taste to a cold glass of homemade lemonade.

But if you want to master the art of making cannabis syrup, you can also add this potent extract to any drink you want.

THE CANNA-SYRUP

INGREDIENTS
  • 3 cups (0.675 litres) of filtered water
  • 3 cups (0.675 litres) granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons of vegetable glycerine (available at any health store)
  • 2 grams cannabis (finely ground)
  • 1 saucepan
  • 1 jar/closed container (i.e. Mason jar)
  • Strainer or cheesecloth

STEP-BY-STEP DIRECTIONS
  1. Put the water and sugar in the saucepan. Bring to a boil, making sure the sugar is fully dissolved. Now, add the cannabis. This is a very important step. You are decarboxylating the cannabis. This means you are making the THC “active.”
  2. Maintain a steady, low boil. This is to make sure you do not damage the THC. Continue this process for about 20 minutes.
  3. Reduce the heat again to a low simmer. Add the glycerine. Let simmer for another 5-6 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Remove from the heat and let cool for a few minutes.
  5. In the meantime, prepare your jar and strainer. The easiest way to do this is to stretch the cheesecloth over the jar opening. Place a rubber band around the cheesecloth to keep it in place. Now carefully and slowly pour the cannabis syrup through the cheesecloth. You should stop when the build-up of cannabis leaves gets too thick. Scrape the leaves back into the saucepan. Continue the process until you have squeezed all liquid from the leaves.
  6. Let this cool.
  7. Now add it to your favourite drinks.

REFRESHING SUMMER LEMONADE

INGREDIENTS
  • 6 cups (1.35 litres) cold water
  • 2 cups (450 millilitres) lemon juice (or 8-10 lemons)
  • 1 cup (225 grams) sugar
  • 3 Teaspoons infused vegetable glycerine or tincture
  • Pinch of salt (optional)

HOW TO MAKE
  1. The easy way to do this of course is just to use lemon juice that is already squeezed. If you extract the juice manually, it will taste better of course. Regardless of where the lemon juice comes from, add it to the water. Mix thoroughly.
  2. Some people actually prefer to use a syrup, rather than sugar. However, this is the stage where you add the sweet stuff. If you are diabetic, use a natural sweetener like Stevia instead. Also note, you should add sugar sparingly. Remember the canna-syrup is super sweet too.
  3. Then add the glycerine and if you prefer, a pinch of salt.
  4. Mix or blend again thoroughly.

Here is where you have options.

You can either add cannabis tincture to the whole mix or by glass. Regardless, once you add the canna-syrup, mix thoroughly.

Making cannabis-infused lemonade is a great way to celebrate summer! Try our easy recipes for canna-syrup infused lemonade.

How to Make a Great-Tasting Cannabis Smoothie

Start with the buds, then bust out the juicer.

Katie Marsh doesn’t look like a stoner, but if you took away her cannabis smoothie, she’d probably clock you. Marsh began her morning ritual of juicing weed one year ago, four years after she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. She tried ibuprofen, prednisone, and wheatgrass. But nothing eased her chronic pain.

A light went on when a friend suggested she try juicing marijuana. “It just struck me as something that might work because it’s very green,” the mother of two, who lives in Madawaska, Maine, tells Esquire. After meeting with cannabis researcher Dr. William Courtney in California, she bought a bag and started juicing it every day. “It wasn’t my goal to be high,” Marsh, 47, says matter-of-factly. “My goal was pain relief.”

Today Marsh’s disease is in remission, through experts say the verdict is out on whether it’s due to the juice. “The acidic form of THC in test tubes has some effect on enzymes involved in inflammation,” says David Casarett, M.D., whose book, Stoned: A Doctor’s Case for Medical Marijuana (Current), is out now. “In theory, there’s reason to think the acidic form has some effects.” Still, he admits there’s no definitive proof.

For those eager to try a cannabis shake, Rich shared a favorite recipe from her self-published book, Juicing Cannabis for Healing. — Jill Krasny

Katie Rich shares a smoothie recipe from her self-published book, Juicing Cannabis for Healing.