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Hemp soap drug test

So I recently started a new job that does random urinalysis drug testing.

One of my favorite shaving soaps lists “Hempseed Oil” as an ingredient (near the bottom of the list). Is there any possible way hempseed oil could make me fail, or trigger a false positive on a drug test? I’ve tried to google this, but the answers are all over the map.

I know the easy solution is simply use a different shave soap (and that’s what I’ve been doing), but I guess I’m just curious now!

    urrlord
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    chamm
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Urinalysis costs between $30 – $50. Now, I don’t have that kind of crazy cash lying around, but I’d be interested to know the answer if anyone decided to perform the experiment. 😀

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    chamm
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Ravi, I’m sure I agree with your hypothesis. However, despite having heard similar ideas about poppy seed muffins, I can tell you as absolute fact that they can and do show up on a urinalysis. Yes, they show up in trace amounts, and anyone with any sense would know from the numbers that it’s unlikely you went on an opium binge the night before. But there have been cases of not-so-smart employers seeing a nonzero amount on a drug screening and causing problems for employees or perspective employees.

I guess if I were designing an experiment, I would try to go overboard as much as possible. (Like wash myself head to toe in hempseed soap for a week.) I am reasonably certain I have never ingested marijuana before, so I would be interested in seeing if I could move the needle to a nonzero amount. And I don’t work at a place where I would be in danger of being fired if that did happen, so I don’t need to worry about that.

Marijuana, specifically, is notoriously tricky in drug testing. You can get enough in your system just by being at a Phish concert to show up on a drug test. (Whether or not your employer considers that a violation is entirely at the discretion of the employer.) And it stays in your system for six weeks.

So, I can say with pretty high confidence that Ravi is almost surely correct – shaving with hempseed soap probably can’t give you enough of anything to show on a screening. But I am open to the idea that you could get it to show up without actually using it, if you were really trying.

Hemp soap drug test So I recently started a new job that does random urinalysis drug testing. One of my favorite shaving soaps lists “Hempseed Oil” as an ingredient (near the bottom of the

Will Hemp Oils and Other Hemp Products Test Positive on Drug Tests?

As a healthcare professional, a common question that I receive when talking to patients and clients who are interested in incorporating the use of hemp products or hemp foods into their daily routine is:

“Will eating hemp foods show up positive for THC on a drug test?”

According to the research studies available, the answer to this is question is a resounding NO! Regular consumption or use of commercially made hemp foods (such as seeds, cooking oil, cereals, milk, granola) or hemp products (lotions, shampoos, lip balms, etc.) will not show a positive result for THC on a drug test.

Hemp-based foods and hemp body products commercially produced and sold in the United States are not legally allowed to contain the potentially psychoactive cannabinoid known as THC (Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol). If a laboratory-tested hemp product did happen to contain trace amounts of this compound, it would be in such small quantities that it would likely require exorbitant amounts of ingestion or use for it to even remotely begin to show up in the smallest amount on a drug test.

However, with that said, consuming non-commercially produced hemp foods, hemp-based oils, or using homemade hemp-based products may have risks to test positive. Non-federally regulated foods and products, like those purchased from a dispensary, farmer’s market, or even products bought online, do not necessarily follow any sort of federal food safety guidelines or food and drug administration regulations. When purchasing these types of hemp products, make sure you use caution and ask questions about how they were made and whether they were tested before being packaged.

Still, generally speaking, hemp-based food and products (federally regulated ones, anyway) shouldn’t show a positive result for THC on a drug test, so keep enjoying your hemp snacks!

As a healthcare professional, a common question that I receive when talking to patients and clients who are interested in incorporating the use of hemp