Categories
BLOG

grow sugar cane indoors

Growing Sugarcane In A Pot: Learn About Sugarcane Container Care

Many gardeners think that growing sugarcane is only possible in tropical climates. This is not actually true if you are willing to grow it in a pot. You can grow potted sugarcane plants in almost any region. If you are interested in growing sugarcane in a pot, read on for info on container grown sugarcane.

Can You Grow Sugarcane in Pots?

You may have seen fields of sugarcane in photos growing in Hawaii or other tropical locations and longed to try growing a little yourself. If you don’t live in a hot climate, try container grown sugarcane. Can you grow sugarcane in pots? Yes, you can, and this makes it possible to have a mini-sugar plantation no matter where you live. The secret is growing the canes in containers.

Container Grown Sugarcane

In order to start growing sugarcane in a pot, you need to obtain a length of sugarcane, ideally around 6 feet (2 m.) long. Look for buds on it. They look like rings on bamboo. Your length should have about 10 of them.

Cut the cane into two pieces of equal length. Prepare a seed tray by filling it with a mixture of one part compost to one part sand. Lay the two cane pieces on the tray horizontally and layer compost over them.

Moisten the soil well and cover the entire tray with plastic to keep in the moisture. Place the tray in bright sunlight. Water the tray every day to keep the soil moist.

After a few weeks, you will see new shoots in your container grown sugarcane. These are called ratoons and, when they grow to 3 inches (7.5 cm.), you can transplant each one to its own pot.

Sugarcane Container Care

Potted sugarcane plants can grow quickly. As the new ratoons grow, you’ll need to transplant them into bigger pots, using an all-purpose potting mixture.

The most important part of sugarcane container care is keeping the soil moist. Since the plants require direct sun most of the day (or 40-watt grow bulbs), they dry out quickly. You’ll need to water at least three times a week.

Remove all dead leaves and keep the pots free from weeds. After about a year, the canes will be 3 feet (1 m.) tall and ready to harvest. Wear leather gloves when you harvest since the leaves of the potted sugarcane plants are very sharp.

Many gardeners think that growing sugarcane is only possible in tropical climates. This is not actually true if you are willing to grow it in a pot. You can grow potted sugarcane plants in almost any region. If you are interested in growing sugarcane in a pot, click here for info.

Want to Propagate Sugarcane Indoors

I’m trying to propagate sugarcane to grow indoors (until it gets too large!).

I have 1 stick, about 2′ long, with 3 internodes and at least 1 good-looking shoot-bud-thing.

The last time I tried this, I followed a method I found in a book. I cut out an internode (with the ‘knuckles’ on either end) , sealed the ends with wax, put it horizontally into a pot with the shoot-bud-thingy pointing upwards and covered it with about 1/2″ of potting mix. Then I put that into a giant ziplock baggie (I do that with most of my seedlings/cuttings) for humidity.

It never actually did anything at all – just sat there and got moldy.

Can anybody give me tips/advice/instructions? Does anybody have a better method?

  • Newest
  • Oldest

Comments (4)

subtropix

I think you’re trying too hard. Sugarcane shouldn’t be that hard to propagate from fresh cane. Recently, I purchased some
fresh cane (a piece about 6.5 feet high). I merely cut it into pieces about one foot in length and stuck them in a potted plant (a parlor palm). In about a month or so, I tugged at the cane and noticed they can rooted. I pulled them all out and planted them in a somewhat sandy soil. I guess bottom heat wouldn’t hurt (but I didn’t use it)–they all rooted at room temp during February. Could it be that your cane isn’t fresh enough? PS. Don’t use the zip lock bag, I bet your cane is rotting from excessive humidity and lack of adequate air circulation!

  • Like
  • Save
ara133

That is good to hear, thank you! Perhaps my cane wasn’t fresh enough last time. it was during winter when I purchased it – who knows where they got it from! I’ll try again – I do have a source for bottom heat (a seedling mat), so I think I’ll put them in a pot on that, but without the ziplock bag. Thank you very much for all your suggestions!! 🙂

The only question I have left then is – how do I know which end is up? The piece doesn’t have a taper. Thanks 🙂
A

  • Like
  • Save

Related Discussions

Curb appeal ideas for this 1960 renovated traditional ranch.

Trying to save these plants.

subtropix

I’m not sure it really matters. I believe you’re supposed to plant them horizontally (I never do). I always plant them vertically and only bury about a third of the cane (when you buy a piece that’s 6-7 feet, it’s pretty obvious which end is up). The cane was then cut into sections about a foot in length. I aim for soil that is only slightly moist (I didn’t water at all for the month that it was rooting in–it was a large container with a host plant for company). A sandy, loose soil is probably best. I have found the freshest cane sold in Asian or Hispanic markets. Good luck!

I'm trying to propagate sugarcane to grow indoors (until it gets too large!). I have 1 stick, about 2' long, with 3 internodes and at least 1 good-looking shoot-bud-thing. The last time I tried this, I followed a method I found in a book. I cut out an internode (with the 'knuckles' on either end) …