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Washington Marijuana Laws

Currently, both medical and recreational marijuana is legal in Washington. As the second state to legalize recreational marijuana, Washington is a hot-spot for cannabis tourism.

Purchasing Marijuana in Washington

Anyone over the age of 21 with a valid ID from any US State (or international passport) can legally purchase marijuana in Washington State, although some local jurisdictions have banned dispensaries within their city limits.

Purchases include both cannabis and cannabis-infused products along with paraphernalia such as pipes, lighters and papers, making most recreational marijuana dispensaries a one-stop smoke shop. When it is time to light up, however, make sure you’re not anywhere near a school, park or public transportation, otherwise you could be subject to a fine.

Purchasing & Possession Limits

Customers can purchase up to one ounce of cannabis flower at a time.The limit for concentrates is seven grams; for edibles it is 16 ounces; and for liquids it is 72 ounces. This is also the limit you can have on your person at any time. If you have any more than this, it’s possible the law will see this as “intent to distribute” and impose jail time or a fine.

Medical marijuana patients, however, have higher possession limits. All cardholders in the state may possess up to three ounces of usable marijuana, forty-eight ounces of marijuana-infused product in solid form, two hundred sixteen ounces of marijuana-infused product in liquid form or, twenty-one grams of marijuana concentrate.

Patients who cultivate their own cannabis are also allowed to possess higher amounts, but only if the cannabis is from their own crop. For the standard 6 plants all medical cardholders are allowed to grow, a patient may possess up to eight ounces of personally cultivated usable marijuana. Those with extended plant counts (up to 15), may possess up to 16 oz (1lb) of useable marijuana. Where to Buy

Delivery

Cannabis delivery of any kind is not allowed in Washington state.

Qualifying Conditions for Medical Marijuana

Washington state’s medical marijuana program is separate and distinct from adult-use regulations. The program allows for different pricing and possession for patients with debilitating or terminal illnesses. The qualifying conditions for the state’s program are:

  • Cancer, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), multiple sclerosis, epilepsy or other seizure disorder, or spasticity disorders.
  • Intractable pain, limited for the purpose of this chapter to mean pain unrelieved by standard medical treatments and medications.
  • Glaucoma, either acute or chronic, limited for the purpose of this chapter to mean increased intraocular pressure unrelieved by standard treatments and medications.
  • Crohn’s disease with debilitating symptoms unrelieved by standard treatments or medications.
  • Hepatitis C with debilitating nausea or intractable pain unrelieved by standard treatments or medications.
  • Diseases, including anorexia, which result in nausea, vomiting, wasting, appetite loss, cramping, seizures, muscle spasms, or spasticity, when these symptoms are unrelieved by standard treatments or medications.
  • Chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Traumatic brain injury.

More information about qualifying conditions can be found on Washington State Department of Health’s website. Get Your Card

Consumption Laws

When it comes to smoking marijuana or consuming cannabis products, it’s against the law to light up in any public place. This means that you can’t smoke a joint on the sidewalk, in a state or federal park, or in any other public place, including private property if it’s close enough to a public space where people can smell the smoke. The best places for consumers to light up are in private homes, medical marijuana collective social clubs, or at marijuana friendly hotels. Remember, discretion is key!

Driving Under the Influence of Marijuana

To be considered driving under the influence of marijuana, you’ll need to have at least five nanograms per milliliter of THC in your bloodstream. As a driver in Washington, you automatically give your consent for drug testing if you’re arrested. However if you refuse the test, you can still face fines and jail time. Bottom line? Avoid smoking and driving to stay on the right side of the law.

Traveling With or Transporting Marijuana

Transporting marijuana from state to state is illegal, whether crossing state lines in a car or sending a package of marijuana products in the mail. Consumers need to be aware that if a package containing marijuana is mailed, both the send and the receiver can face prosecution from both states.The consequences of breaking these laws could result in fines and up to five years in prison, depending on the amount.

Cultivation of Marijuana

Neither dispensaries, processors, nor private growers are allowed to grow their own marijuana without looking at a hefty fine of up to $10,000 and five years behind bars, regardless of whether or not there is intent to sell.

In fact, the only businesses that are strictly regulated to cultivate marijuana in Washington are licensed grow facilities, who deliver the product to dispensaries after harvest.

Medical marijuana patients, however, can grow their own cannabis. All cardholding patients may cultivate up to 6 plants, and those that get special dispensation from their doctor may grow up to 15 plants. Those that cultivate their own crop will have increased possession limits as well (8oz and 16 oz respectively). Learn to Grow

Consumption by Minors

There’s no way around it. To purchase or smoke marijuana in Washington, you need to be at least 21 years of age or older. If a minor is caught consuming marijuana, they could incur fines, suspension of a driver’s license, and even drug rehab. In fact, minors are not even allowed inside a marijuana dispensary in Washington. Having said this, minors with medical issues can receive a medical marijuana prescription from their doctor.

Legal information about medical and recreational marijuana laws in Washington, including Seattle, Spokane and Tacoma.

STATE OF THE STATE: Washington State Marijuana Policy

Always pushing the boundaries of progressive social experimentation, Washington State was one of the first two states to decriminalize marijuana for both medical and recreational possession and use.

Washington State’s Initiative 502 (I-502), decriminalized recreational marijuana, was voted into law in November 2012.

Originally, recreational and medical marijuana were regulated by separate agencies but since 2016 regulation of both medical and recreational marijuana are regulated jointly by the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board

To legally possess and use marijuana in Washington State you must be 21 years of age or older. Users may possess:

• One ounce of usable marijuana
• Marijuana-related paraphernalia
• 16 ounces of solid marijuana-infused product
• 72 ounces of liquid marijuana-infused product

Washington State residents may not grow marijuana plants in their homes because Washington State law requires police to have 24 hour a day access to a growing facility without a warrant. However there is an exception for medical marijuana in which case cultivation of plants is limited to medical use:

• Growers must be 21 or older
• Up to four plants can be grown without registration
• Cooperative gardens are allowed
• Registration is recommended but not required

Registered medical marijuana users can purchase cannabis at any retail cannabis outlet holding a medical marijuana authorization. Registered medical marijuana users can purchase any combination of the following:

• Forty eight (48) ounces of marijuana-infused products in solid form
• Three (3) ounces of usable cannabis
• Two hundred sixteen (216) ounces of cannabis-infused products in liquid form
• Twenty one grams of cannabis concentrates

As a registered medical marijuana patient, you will also be authorized to grow and possess in your home:

• Up to six (6) plants for personal medical use
• Up to eight (8) ounces of usable cannabis produced from said plants

Washington State has approved medical marijuana for a wide variety of conditions including:

• Cancer,
• Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),
• Multiple sclerosis,
• Epilepsy or other seizure disorder, or spasticity disorders.
• Intractable pain,
• Glaucoma,
• Crohn’s disease,
• Hepatitis C,
• Diseases, including anorexia, which result in nausea, vomiting, wasting, appetite loss, cramping, seizures, muscle spasms, or spasticity, when these symptoms are unrelieved by standard treatments or medications.
• Chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis.
• Posttraumatic stress disorder.
• Traumatic brain injury.

In general legalizing marijuana use has been a good thing for the Evergreen State. Violent crime and opioid use are down and tax revenues are up. But it’s not all good news. So many individuals and enterprises have gotten into the marijuana cultivation and distribution business that the state is suffering from a glut of over production.

In recent years annual production has increased by 60% driving the retail price of an ounce of legal marijuana flower to as low as $40 (in some states the price for an ounce of flower exceed $400). Both shop owners and producers are seeking changes to Washington’s cannabis regulations.

Medical and recreational marijuana cultivation and distribution is still an industry in its infancy in the U.S. We will continue to follow its evolution and keep you informed of trends and developments.

A marketing and publishing professional and the Director of Publicity at GB Sciences, Liz Bianco monitors media activity and the “State of the States” on cannabis in America.

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STATE OF THE STATE: Washington State Marijuana Policy Always pushing the boundaries of progressive social experimentation, Washington State was one of the first two states to decriminalize ]]>