Can Good Weed Have Seeds

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Seeded Weed? Is it Okay to Smoke It? You are browsing online and checking out all the different strains. There is a local dispensary that is selling medical cannabis at an unbelievable price. Every smoker has had the thought cross their mind: Could I grow my own weed? Before undertaking this endeavor, here's what to look for, and how to do it. I love seedless weed. It’s just so easy. But now, instead of grumbling on the rare occasions when I find a marijuana seed, I get excited.

Seeded Weed? Is it Okay to Smoke It?

You are browsing online and checking out all the different strains. There is a local dispensary that is selling medical cannabis at an unbelievable price. Really? Only forty dollars per ounce? And it is a great strain that you usually buy. Seeded weed? What does that mean?

Photo Credit: SpliffSeeds.com

At the top of the discounted ‘flash sale’ status of the cannabis, you see a phrase that confuses the heck out of you. And it stands out like kind of a warning; “heavily seeded.” Unless you are a cannabis expert, you probably think seeds are no big deal. They are still natural, right? And they probably have the same amount of THC.

When a grower makes a little bit of a goof-up, and the cannabis is allowed to get frisky with other plants in the greenhouse, seeded nugs happen. Everyone loves a discount! They are a great deal. Having seeds in your whole flower cannabis must be just an aesthetic thing that people don’t like.

Think twice before you get the bargain basement cannabis loaded up with seeds. No, it’s not going to add more fiber to your diet (although you could use seeded cannabis for making edibles). But as far as using it in your pipe? Definitely read up on why it is discounted before you buy.

Photo Credit: Yarygin | Deposit Photos

The Birds and The Bees: Cannabis is a Highly Evolved Plant

Did you know that about 80% of plants on the planet are self-pollinating? Cannabis is a highly evolved plant. It is a dioecious species, which means it has separate male and female plants. Cannabis plants have three sexes. There can be male plants and female plants. And occasionally, a strain will produce hermaphrodite plants (both male and female).

If you were walking through a medical dispensary’s greenhouse, you would see plants that have zero flowers. Lots of leaves, though, but no buds. Then you would see plants blooming with buds. Guess which one is the female plant?

The male cannabis plant is worth empathizing with. He tries hard but barely gets a date. The male cannabis plant typically has a thinner stalk and fewer leaves. But the male cannabis plant grows and produces valuable pollen taken by the wind or breeze to nearby female plants. (Cue the disco music). And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how marijuana buds are born.

Every time a cannabis plant seeds, it is a 50/50 split between male and female seedlings. Some strains can produce up to 75% of male plants. But you can’t tell in a greenhouse until they have started to grow. It usually takes about six weeks in the greenhouse before female plants begin to bloom. Then the male cannabis plants are separated from the female cannabis plants.

The female plants are valuable because they will produce crops of flowers or buds. Male plants, however, are not the star of the show, and they are either mulched for fertilizer or repurposed into other cannabis products.

What Happens to Male Cannabis Plants?

Dispensaries are interested in cultivating cannabis flowers from female plants. Some of the male plants are kept if they show specific attributes that are valuable for breeding. You plant corn, you get corn? It’s a little more complicated with cannabis. Most of the male plants are incredibly low in cannabinoids. Not all of them but most. And so, other than pollination, to a commercial dispensary, the male cannabis plant isn’t worth keeping around.

During the vegetative growth phase (when cannabis is maturing into a seedling), the male plants have higher THC concentrates in the leaves. It is only when the female plants mature to the adult stage that they have a higher potency. Female plants are the only sex to create sinsemilla. That is the compound that produces the psychoactive effects in THC.

Male cannabis plants don’t have a very long lifespan. Cultivators worldwide have tried to breed in high THC and bloom production in male plants, but with no success. You can’t delay the pollination process for male plants, nor can you breed enhanced resin production for male cannabis.

More sad news for male cannabis plants; their pollen is detrimental to female plants. So, if you have a happy crop of male cannabis plants sending their pollen over to the ladies on the other side of the aisle, it can stifle the crop. It will reduce the size and production of female cannabis plants.

Hermaphrodite Cannabis Plants Have It Worse

The creation of hermaphrodites or both male and female sexed organisms is a rare occurrence in nature. But the genetic anomaly can happen to any species on the planet. And that includes the cannabis plant.

Hermaphrodite cannabis plants are considered trouble. When they are discovered, they are separated from other female plants. A few hermaphrodite plants can ruin an entire harvest and jeopardize the quality of the flowers produced. They are found, uprooted, and destroyed in a way that does not allow them to cross-pollinate with any other plants. It’s very much ‘seek and destroy’ when a cultivator finds them in the greenhouse.

The potential for genetically mutated hermaphrodite plants to reproduce with quality strains is very high. So, it is very much ‘seek and destroy’ when a cultivator finds them in the greenhouse.

Photo Credit: Yarygin | Deposit Photos

What Is Seeded Weed Good For?

When you look at a seeded flower, the composition seems similar but extra chunky. Throughout the bud, you will notice seeds of different sizes. Fully germinated and non-germinated seeds (or baby seeds). More fiber! So, the cannabis seeds must be good for you? Well, they are. Just not in your pipe or cone.

There is a market for marijuana seeds because they contain many health benefits. They are a great nutritional resource and have more than thirty (30) healthy fats. Some of the types of healthy fats include alpha-linoleic acid, which is the plant version of omega-3 fatty acid. They are also a high source of plant-based clean proteins.

Fiber! Boy, are cannabis seeds full of fiber, and they are great for digestive health. So much so that some clinical studies have suggested that cannabis seeds can reduce intestinal and colon cancers. Both soluble and insoluble fiber is found in cannabis seeds.

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The soluble fiber is absorbed quickly and makes you feel full longer while providing energy. The insoluble fiber has a cleaning effect. It doesn’t digest but has an exfoliating impact as it travels through the digestive tract.

There are many supplements and nutritional products that are made from cannabis seeds. Also, for cosmetic products and skincare. Cannabis seeds are also high in an amino acid called arginine, which helps with muscle relaxation, blood vessel dilation, and reduced blood pressure. Cannabis seeds are often used for nutritional products sold for weight loss.

Why Are There Seeds In Cannabis Flower the Dispensary is Selling?

Full disclosure? Cultivators and dispensaries know that ‘seeded weed’ is a goof up. They know that it still can provide some wellness benefits. However, both the aesthetic and some of the seeded weed side-effects make the product less desirable to patients.

Does seeded weed still have THC and psychoactive properties? Yes. The cannabis potency is usually not any different, and it is still tested before being sold. The website of the dispensary will confirm the THC content in the description of the product.

Seeded weed happens when pollen from a male cannabis plant touches the female plant. Congratulations, you have a baby seed. But a lot of pollen can interact in a single exchange (from more than one male plant). That’s when you end up with bud that looks like an apocalypse of seeds in the cannabis colas.

Photo Credit: TeriVirbickis | Deposit Photos

Can You Grow Cannabis from Seeds You Find In Your Medical Bud?

If you live in a state that has legalized home-growing for personal use, you may be looking at those seeds and wondering if you should plant them? What would happen if you collected all the seeds and then tried to plant them?

Some seeds would germinate, and others would not. But when you are trying to cultivate seeds from a cannabis strain that has been prone to seedy weed, you would not want to grow plants that had the same properties. That would be lower quality cannabis. And you’d be stuck with more seeds. No one wants to reproduce a mediocre hybrid.

What Happens if You Smoke Cannabis With Seeds In It?

It’s cheap. Maybe you are thinking of just throwing it into the grinder and packing your bowl to see what happens? Well, unfortunately, when you incinerate seeds, you are changing the chemistry quite a lot. And while they can produce psychoactive and physiological effects (you will still get high), they can also produce some side-effects.

Both cannabis seeds and stems should be picked out and not consumed. They both contain cellulose, which burns at a hotter temperature than marijuana flowers. And that cellulose, when incinerated, produces carcinogenic toxins (cancer-causing). It makes the smoke hotter and harsher on your respiratory tract.

Some of the other side-effects that patients have experienced when smoking weed seeds are:

  • Nausea
  • Gastrointestinal and abdominal pain
  • Headaches
  • Sore Throat
  • Cough

Finally, if you do happen to roll some cannabis seeds in your cone, it’s going to freak you out a little bit—the seeds pop and crackle. Very loudly when you incinerate them, it’s kind of feels like taking a drag off a lit firecracker. No thanks!

What Do I Do With Cannabis Seeds If I Can’t Smoke Them?

Just because cannabis seeds are not ideal for smoking doesn’t mean that they will go to waste. There are other ways you can repurpose them after you separate or sift them from your bud.

Try placing stems and seeds on a baking tray in the oven for about 40 minutes to decarboxylate the cannabis. That activates it. Then, you can grind them up and use them to create a tea or a cannabis-infused butter. You can even add it to your flour if you want to bake some buzz-worthy edibles at home.

Another cool idea for seeds and stems is to add them (after decarboxylation) to a liqueur. You’ve seen vodka’s with hot peppers in the bottle, right? Same thing! You can place them into a bottle of vodka or whisky for a week and then filter them out. Repeat this process every week for a few months to build up the THC content in the alcohol.

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Can You Plant the Seeds from Your Cannabis Buds?

You’re preparing your bud, getting ready to grind it down, and you lift it up a bit to admire its color and… what’s that? A little speck, either green or brown, sitting right in your bud! Are my buds bad?

Well, worry not, those are just marijuana seeds. It seems pretty obvious if you think about it – marijuana is a plant, and plants have seeds. Simple, right?

However, every smoker has had the thought cross their mind on this seed discovery: Could I grow my own weed?

Well, before you can consider whether or not you can plant those assorted seeds, you need to know what to look for, and how to do it.

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Homegrown CannabisCo

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

Why Are There Seeds in My Marijuana Buds?

First of all, you need to understand why there are seeds in your bud to begin with.

Contrary to what most people think, what you’re smoking isn’t actually the rolled up or dried leaves of the Cannabis Sativa plant. You’re actually smoking small flower buds.

It does seem rather odd, considering the prolific nature of the marijuana leaf in stoner culture – we even have images stretching back thousands of years, documented in ancient texts, of the marijuana leaf.

However, the leaf isn’t actually very interesting. It just absorbs sunlight and feeds the plant. According to the United Nations report* on cannabinoid levels between both male and female plants, the large leaves of some specimens only contain about 0.3% THC and 0.7% CBD, meaning you’d be hard-pressed to get any kind of high from the leaves.

No, it’s actually the flowering buds of the marijuana plant that get you high. When the plant is preparing to flower, thus allowing itself to germinate and spread its seeds so as to propagate itself, it creates these small bunches of buds – known as a cola – that are the beginnings of the flower buds.

These little buds are where all the THC and CBD are concentrated, divided between a variety of different parts of the bud. When the plant is harvested, that cola is all mixed together and dried, giving you your whole piece of bud.

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However, sometimes a marijuana plant is harvested just a bit too late. Perhaps it got the chance to develop a bit longer than it would normally, or maybe the grower was just trying something new.

Regardless, the small seed of the marijuana plant is born, and it managed to make its way into your bud.

Now that we know what they are, how do we choose and use them?

What Do the Seeds Look Like?

You might be tempted to jump right in and start growing your new seeds. Not so fast though, you’ve got to pick the right seeds.

Take a look at your seed and make sure it’s the right color. It should be brown and entirely whole, not split apart or otherwise damaged.

If it’s green or yellowish, that means the seed had only just begun to grow before it was harvested, making it little more useful than the rest of the bud for growing plants.

If it’s brown and whole however, you’ve got yourself a healthy marijuana seed.
Now what? Do you just plant it and watch it grow?

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Homegrown CannabisCo

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

Next Steps: Germinating Your Marijuana Seeds

Before you can do any kind of planting of your seed, you first need to germinate it.

Germination is the initial process in a seed’s life, when it starts to transform for a hard, brown little shell into a living plant.

To germinate a marijuana seed, it takes a little more love and care than with some other plant seeds.
Firstly, take a plate or some other surface with a divot in it and lay a wet paper towel across the plate’s surface.

Lay your lovely brown seeds on the paper towel, making sure to give them as much room as possible.
Cover it with another piece of wet paper towel and cover the whole thing with another plate of equal size. This should make a handy little clam-shaped house for your germinating seeds.

What happens to the seeds is that they are tricked into thinking they have been successfully buried into soil.

Water activates the growing enzymes within the seeds, encouraging it to strip off its protective outer layer and start creating roots to lay into the ground.

The reason we don’t just put the seed into the soil is that marijuana seeds can be a bit particular – they require conditions to be just right, otherwise, they’ll fail to germinate and simply sit there. By putting them in a little protective case made of paper towels and plates, the seeds get the perfect environment to germinate.

Even using the towel and plate method, it’s possible that around a quarter of your seeds still won’t germinate.

The germination process can take up to around 10 days, but most will begin the process after 2-3 days. Any that don’t show signs of opening up and spreading roots can be safely thrown away.

Now that you’ve got yourself some germinated seeds, what’s next? How do you turn a plate full of damp seeds into a full-blown marijuana plant?

Planting the Seeds

Once your seeds are germinated, you can plant your miniature weed plants into a small soil pot, being careful not to overcrowd them. A small quantity of high quality of soil – marijuana needs a crazy amount of nitrogen, potassium and other nutrients to flourish – in a small pot is sufficient.

Keep the soil moist and allow the seeds to begin to sprout.

After a few days to roughly a week, the seed will begin to spread out its roots and start to shoot up towards the sun. You’ll likely even see the very beginnings of tiny marijuana leaves!

Once you’ve got those handy leaves, it’s time to transfer them into a bigger growing vessel.
Get a common plant pot – something in the 5-gallon range is pretty standard – and fill the very bottom of it with gravel.

This gravel helps provide a good base for the soil, as well as providing drainage.

The rest can be filled with high-quality soil and, once given adequate fertilizers, the marijuana seeds will start to grow!

Now, just treat your marijuana plant as you would any other plant. Keep it watered, keep it fed with a high nutrient liquid fertilizer and make sure it gets enough sunlight.

If you’re planning to grow cannabis indoors, away from prying eyes, and then make sure you have an adequate UV light setup to make sure it gets enough sunlight. Don’t forget to make sure the room where it’s kept is hot and humid enough!

There’s a reason that marijuana is usually grown outdoors in humid, jungle-like climates!

Some Notes of Warning

Only a few things can go wrong when you’re growing your own marijuana plants from the seeds in your bud. They’re not the worst things to ever happen, but they should definitely be considered.

#1 Knowing What You’re Getting

It’s not a frequent problem if you’re buying from a trusted marijuana supplier, but it’s possible that the seed in your bud isn’t exactly the same weed strain you think it might be.

Some unscrupulous sellers sometimes mix in small amounts of other buds to help bring up the bulk of their strains, whether through lack of availability or because they think it might improve the quality.

Though it is rare, it’s possible you might go to all this effort of growing a marijuana plant from your bud, only to find out that it’s not the right strain at all.

This is part of the reason why people generally prefer to buy their seeds from a reputable seed seller, due to the fact that you are more likely to know what you’re getting.

The other reason is…

#2 Seed Survivability – It Might Be Too Dry!

As part of the process of preparing marijuana buds for consumption, the bud is sun-dried over a period of days – or using a dehydrator – so as to concentrate the flavors and cannabinoids, as well as make it a lot easier to smoke.

During this process, it’s possible that the seeds might suffer damage and not be entirely usable. It’s possible that, after putting that time and use of your valuable plates into trying to germinate your seeds, none of them will bloom.

That’s okay though, you can just try again!

So Can You Plant the Seeds from Your Marijuana Buds?

If you’ve followed all these steps, you’ll have managed to turn a lone seed – depressingly isolated, hiding in your bud – into a fully grown marijuana plant!

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Enjoy harvesting your new marijuana and keep an eye out for new seeds in your freshly harvested buds.
Given some time, you might find yourselves planting the great-granddaughter of your first seed!

A final note: Make sure you check the laws of your local area – certain municipal governments have different laws about growing marijuana when compared to just imbibing it. Make sure you’re not breaking any laws with your hand-grown marijuana – you wouldn’t want it taken away from you after all your hard work!

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Homegrown CannabisCo

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

What To Do If You Find Seeds In Your Weed

When I lived in the Midwest, I would drive 70 miles each way to buy weed. I would buy whatever strain my dealer had. And I knew I’d end up with a lot of marijuana seeds.

Like most smokers, I wanted as much smokeable bud as possible, and seeds always felt like a net loss. I couldn’t smoke them. I couldn’t use them to grow my own plant (not in Indiana, anyway). So I threw them away.

After moving to Boulder, I almost forgot about seedy cannabis.

I would stop by Karing Kind dispensary every week or two, buying anywhere from an eighth to an ounce, and over the years I have found fewer than five seeds in my weed.

Pounds and pounds of clean-grown, top-shelf bud… five total seeds. That’s an incredible track record!

But as I’ve come to appreciate, finding seeds in your weed doesn’t have to be a bad thing. The occasional seed hardly affects how much flower you have to smoke, and with a little effort it has the potential to turn into your very own pot plant. Hooray! Free weed!

I still love seedless marijuana. It’s just so easy to grind and smoke. But now, instead of grumbling on those rare occasions when I find a seed, I get excited.

Seed Be Gone: Top-Shelf Cannabis Grown With the Best Available Methods

The plants grown in Karing Kind’s garden are carefully monitored and cared for. Male plants are removed prior to pollination, and female plants are nurtured to reduce stress, which limits the occurrence of self-pollinating hermaphroditic plants.

This all goes to ensure the bud you buy is as potent and dense as possible, with limited stems and almost no seeds. And that means more smokeable marijuana.

Of course, after more than a year without finding even a single seed in my cannabis, I began to rethink my resistance to seedy weed.

After all, Colorado residents are allowed to grow their own cannabis plants for personal use… shouldn’t I be actively hoping for seeds that I could try to turn into my own source of top-shelf marijuana?

Are Cannabis Seeds from Recreational Dispensary Bud Worth Growing?

Who wouldn’t want a chance at growing their own marijuana, especially when you know you’re getting a favorite strain and what potency and effects you can expect?

But seeds you find in store-bought weed are not the same as seeds that have been stabilized over time. In some cases, seeds won’t maintain the potency, yield or fragrance of the original plant. This potential change in quality is why many growers prefer to use clones.

That doesn’t mean you should just throw out seeds you find!

It’s still a free cannabis seed with the potential to produce a high-yielding plant you couldn’t grow otherwise. No, it might not end up being an exact clone of the strain you found it in. But when you’re starting with top-shelf bud, even a slight shift in the next generation’s quality will yield potent, flavorful flower.

Try to get your seed to sprout, and give it time to flower before deciding whether to maintain that plant or move on to greener pastures.

What Do Viable Marijuana Seeds Look Like?

The only sure way to know if a seed is viable is to try to germinate and see if it sprouts.

Generally speaking, viable seeds are darker and relatively hard. Even if a seed is pale and easy to crush between your fingers, however, it’s worth trying to get a sprout before giving up on the seed as nonviable.

What’s the Difference Between Seeds You Find and Seeds You Buy?

When you buy seeds from a trusted breeder, like those sold at Karing Kind recreational marijuana dispensary in Boulder, you can expect they will carry the same properties of the “mother” plant. That’s because these seeds have been carefully stabilized over generations.

The seeds you find in store-bought marijuana flower aren’t even supposed to be there. That doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with the seeds you find… there’s just a little more room for variations in the quality and yield of the plant the seed grows.

Even when buying seeds from trusted breeders, there isn’t any guarantee your plant will exactly mirror the mother plant. Your growing method, soil, temperature, lights and dozens of other factors can all impact the yield, smell and potency of the plant.

Learn more about how to set up your home grow , and let us know in the comments if you have turned any “unwanted” seeds into your very own cannabis plant.

To Seed or Not to Seed…

The only time I have a green thumb is after eating lime jello. I once managed to kill a cactus. If I’m going to try my hand at growing something again, it may as well be with free cannabis seeds.

Because of their attention to detail and careful growing methods, you aren’t likely to find seeds in the flower you buy at Karing Kind. Just pure, top-shelf marijuana. But i f you do find a seed, why not see how it grows? You could end up with your very own cannabis plant and a free, ongoing supply of top-shelf flower.

Or – if you want to ensure the most bud for your effort – you can buy stabilized seeds from Freeworld Genetics for pickup at Karing Kind in North Boulder.

While we carry a variety of strains, concentrates, edibles, salves and tinctures, inventory and stock levels fluctuate from week to week and month to month. Check our menu and follow us on Twitter for an up-to-date list of edibles, concentrates and buds available.

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