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Brix Meter (refractometer)

Maccabee
Well-Known Member

Has anyone used a brix meter as part of their grow?

Also known a refractometer (or reflectometer?) , a brix meter measures the sugar content of plant tissue. It has a prism on one end and an eyepiece on the other. When a drop of sap or juice is viewed through the meter a reading is given that indicates dissolved solids in the plant’s system. This can give a much better picture of plant health than guesswork based on how the foliage looks etc. as well as alerting the grower to deficiencies or toxicities in the soil/medium/water.
I think they can also be used to assess ripeness, as I originally heard of them in the context of wine-making (although perhaps sugar levels can’t be used to gauge ripeness in Cannabis as it is in grape vines.)

The meter isn’t terribly expensive, around $100 for a Milwaukee.

Has anyone had any experience with these?

http://www.extech.com/instrument/products/alpha/manuals/RF10_15_UM.pdf
[Instruction manual for an extech brix meter, shows the usage procedure and the kind of data collected.]

The Growing Edge Magazine – Gadgets and Gear for Hi-Tech Hydroponics
[this is a crazy article that will make you wish you could print money. The brix meters are mentioned towards the end.]

Has anyone used a brix meter as part of their grow? Also known a refractometer (or reflectometer?) , a brix meter measures the sugar content of plant…

Brix Levels And What It Means To Cannabis

jumpincactus
Premium Member

It has been a few years since I 1st learned of Brix levels and what it means to my plants.

There used to be a lot of awesome discussions here at the farm on what brix is and what it means to the overall terpene and taste profile of well grown organic living soil grown cannabis.

How many of you are familiar with Brix levels?, how many are measuring your brix with a refractometer and what methods do you use to increase your Brix levels? Do you take the time to determine your Brix levels during harvest?

I invite all that are interested in this science to participate and share your knowledge with the Farm. And even more so those farmers who don’t have a clue what brix is or how to get there, follow along and learn.

leadsled
GrowRU

Excellent topic. I test brix with a refractometer. In addition to brix levels, also test for calcium, potassium, and ph. Helps get a better picture of what is going down. I use soil testing along with sap testing to determine if what you are doing is working or not.

For example: Test brix of one plant. Do a foliar spray or drench. Then re-test the brix again 2 hours later. Did you get a positive plant response or not?
If you got a positive response than apply to entire crop.

jumpincactus
Premium Member

Excellent topic. I test brix with a refractometer. In addition to brix levels, also test for calcium, potassium, and ph. Helps get a better picture of what is going down. I use soil testing along with sap testing to determine if what you are doing is working or not.

For example: Test brix of one plant. Do a foliar spray or drench. Then re-test the brix again 2 hours later. Did you get a positive plant response or not?
If you got a positive response than apply to entire crop.

Now thats what I’m talking about. Good to c u sled 🙂

There are a lot of reasons to maintain hi brix in all plants not just cannabis. For the obvious reasons is taste and terp profiles. But often overlooked or undervalued is there is evidence that hi brix goes a long way to overall health and vigor and boosting the plants immune system and defending against pests. Seems they dont like hi brix sap as much a a plant suffering from low brix levels.

jumpincactus
Premium Member

Here is a link for those farmers not yet familiar with Brix and what it menas to your food /plants.

jumpincactus
Premium Member

And here is another link to help you understand the steps to take to getting to a hi brix garden.

jumpincactus
Premium Member

A link for a brix level refractometer,

MamaBear
jumpincactus
Premium Member

Hey Mama I’m not sure I agree completely with your take on cannabis fade i.e. autumn colors. More of what determines fade or autumn colors is a compound called “anthocyanins” and is found in most c3 plants however it is a genetic thing and that’s why some strains purported to be granddaddy purps show some green phenos with no purple due to the level of anthocyanin in the gene pool. Not all cannabis strains or phenos contain enough anthocyanin to give us that gorgeous autumn fade.

Anthocyanins (also anthocyans; from Greek: ἄνθος (anthos) “flower” and κυάνεος/κυανοῦς kyaneos/kyanous “dark blue”) are water-soluble vacuolar pigments that, depending on their pH, may appear red, purple, or blue. Food plants rich in anthocyanins include the blueberry, raspberry, black rice, and black soybean, among many others that are red, blue, purple, or black. Some of the colors of autumn leaves are derived from anthocyanins.[1][2]

Anthocyanins belong to a parent class of molecules called flavonoids synthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway. They occur in all tissues of higher plants, including leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Anthocyanins are derived from anthocyanidins by adding sugars.[3] They are odorless and moderately astringent. Although approved to color foods and beverages in the European Union, anthocyanins are not approved for use as a food additive because they have not been verified as safe when used as food or supplement ingredients.[4] There is no high-quality evidence anthocyanins have any effect on human biology or diseases.

Did you know you can control to some degree coloration by adjusting your soils Ph in the rhizosphere?

Heres a great article explaining the process.

Enjoy and pass that knowledge on. 😀

upon rereading my response being anthocyanin is a flavonoid!u may be right when you were speaking to sugars causing the coloration in fall. Mhhhhhh let me get back to you. A toke and a journey and will be back.

It has been a few years since I 1st learned of Brix levels and what it means to my plants. There used to be a lot of awesome discussions here at the farm…